Smart Kids Set S.M.A.R.T. Goals

There are many time management training tools available, but one of the most useful is the S.M.A.R.T. method, which first appeared in the November 1981 issue of Management Review. It perfectly explains how goals should be set up. The S.M.A.R.T. Method. (S) – Specific. A goal should be clearly defined, using details to describe specifically what the goal will be. So it’s not enough to say “I want to lose weight.” You must specify exactly how many pounds you want to lose. “I want to lose fifteen pounds.” (M) – Measurable. You must be able to measure a clear beginning and ending to your goal, with measurable results. “I now weigh 165 pounds. In thirty days I will weigh 150 pounds.” (A) – Active. You must take active responsibility for achieving the goal. Passive: “I’m going to lose fifteen pounds if I ever get enough time to go to the gym.” This puts no responsibility on you. Active: “I’m going to lose fifteen pounds by the end of January.” (R) – Realistic. Any goal you set must be realistic. “I’m going to lose one hundred pounds in thirty days” is not only unrealistic, it’s dangerous, but losing fifteen pounds in thirty days is very realistic and doable with the proper tools and actions. (T) – Time Bound. Every goal must have a timeframe within which it will be completed. Businesses don’t reach goals by saying to their employees “Here’s a project for you, but it really doesn’t matter when you get it done.” When will you have those fifteen pounds off, exactly? Having your S.M.A.R.T. plan in writing will keep you organized and allow you to see where you are in the process rather than trying to remember what you have to do and when.

Smart Kids Set S.M.A.R.T. Goals